Pen Academic Publishing   |  e-ISSN: 2602-4772

Original article | International Journal of Innovative Approaches in Agricultural Research 2019, Vol. 3(4) 651-660

Relationship between Morphologic, Phenotypic and Pathogenic Characteristics in Macrophomina phaselina Isolates from Cucumber Plants

Fatih Mehmet Tok

pp. 651 - 660   |  DOI: https://doi.org/10.29329/ijiaar.2019.217.11   |  Manu. Number: MANU-1909-27-0001

Published online: December 10, 2019  |   Number of Views: 39  |  Number of Download: 202


Abstract

During 2018 summer season, surveys were carried out in cucumber growing areas of Hatay province of Turkey. Roots and crowns of cucumber plants showing disease symptoms such as yellowing, wilting, root rot, damping-off and gumming were collected. A total of 25 Macrophomina phaseolina isolates were determined by morphologic characteristics on PDA medium. Colony sizes were measured after incubation for 3 days on PDA and colony diameters ranged from 45 to 81mm. A strong positive correlation was present between mycelial growth and disease severity (R=0,801). PDA medium amended with 120 mM potassium chlorate was used for phenotyping. Eight isolates were dense, 12 isolates feathery and 5 isolates were restricted. A high correlation was present between mycelial growth and disease severity (R=0.920). Sclerotia size of M. phaseolina isolates ranged from 19.1 to 29.9. In the pathogenicity test, cucumber seedlings were transplanted to plastic pots containing potting mixture of soil, perlite, peat (1:1:1) amended with 50g of M. phaseolina inoculum grown in cornmeal-sand mixture. Disease severity was measured with a 0-4 scale according to the symptoms on roots. Disease severity index was varied from 2 to 4 and virulence was significantly different (P<0.05) among isolates. Dense isolates were most virulent with the 3.75 mean disease scale followed by Feathery and Restricted phenotyped isolates with 3.17 and 2.27 respectively. According to the results of this study, a high correlation (R=0.92) was determined between chlorate phenotype and virulence in M. phaseolina isolates from cucumber plants in Turkey. 

Keywords: Macrophomina, Phenotype, Pathogenicity, Virulence, Soil-borne


How to Cite this Article?

APA 6th edition
Tok, F.M. (2019). Relationship between Morphologic, Phenotypic and Pathogenic Characteristics in Macrophomina phaselina Isolates from Cucumber Plants . International Journal of Innovative Approaches in Agricultural Research, 3(4), 651-660. doi: 10.29329/ijiaar.2019.217.11

Harvard
Tok, F. (2019). Relationship between Morphologic, Phenotypic and Pathogenic Characteristics in Macrophomina phaselina Isolates from Cucumber Plants . International Journal of Innovative Approaches in Agricultural Research, 3(4), pp. 651-660.

Chicago 16th edition
Tok, Fatih Mehmet (2019). "Relationship between Morphologic, Phenotypic and Pathogenic Characteristics in Macrophomina phaselina Isolates from Cucumber Plants ". International Journal of Innovative Approaches in Agricultural Research 3 (4):651-660. doi:10.29329/ijiaar.2019.217.11.

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